Latest version of Vivaldi browser includes an arcade game

Vivaldi launched version 3.4 of its eponymous browser on Thursday. There are the usual technical refinements, but the ‘feature’ that catches the eye the most is… the ingrained arcade game Vivaldia.

Vivaldi 3.4 is available for Windows, macOS, Linux and Android devices, and the Game can be played on all of these platforms – both online and offline. Simply surf to the address vivaldi://game and the action can begin. You can play on the computer via the cursor keys, but there is also support for game controllers.

CyclePunk

The developer describes Vivaldia itself as an 80s arcade game inspired by the Cyberpunk and Future Noir genres. However, a bit of gamer will also immediately find elements of Nintendo’s Mario Bros. recognise.

The story in a nutshell: Peaceful city is taken over by evil machines that want to turn people into numbers, and the only one who can prevent that is Vivaldia. On her CyclePunk unicycle, she takes on the enemy, trying to reclaim the city and the future of its inhabitants. Vivaldia is not the first game in a browser, by the way. There is also one in Google Chrome, which starts automatically when you do not have an internet connection for a while.

Unlimited customization

There are of course also some other novelties in Vivaldi 3.4. For example, the user can adjust contextual menus more to his liking, web pages are automatically reloaded, and screenshots are immediately added to a new note if desired.

Furthermore, Vivaldi is mainly the browser with almost unlimited possibilities to adjust the look and feel of the program to your liking. Do you prefer the address bar or your tabs at the bottom of the screen, or do you want a different background image on your favorites page? Vivaldi is guaranteed to provide a setting for it.

For those who don’t know the history of Vivaldi: the man behind the program, the Icelandic programmer and entrepreneur Jón Von Tetzchner, was the CEO of Opera Software for a long time. At that company, the maker of the Opera browser, he closed the door behind him in 2011 out of dissatisfaction. Opera, according to von Tetzchner, no longer served ‘the interests of the users nor of the programmers who helped set up the company in 1994’. In 2015, the Scandinavian hit back with a first test version of its Vivaldi browser, of which version 3.4 was released on Thursday.

Vivaldi 3.4 is available for Windows, macOS, Linux and Android devices, and the Game can be played on all of these platforms – both online and offline. Simply surf to the address vivaldi://game and the action can begin. You can play on the computer via the cursor keys, but there is also support for game controllers. The developer describes Vivaldia itself as an 80s arcade game that is inspired by the genres Cyberpunk and Future Noir. However, a bit of gamer will also immediately find elements of Nintendo’s Mario Bros. The story in a nutshell: Peaceful city is taken over by evil machines that want to turn people into numbers, and the only one who can prevent that is Vivaldia. On her CyclePunk unicycle, she takes on the enemy, trying to reclaim the city and the future of its inhabitants. Vivaldia is not the first game in a browser, by the way. There is also one in Google Chrome, which starts automatically when you do not have an internet connection for a while. There are of course also some other novelties in Vivaldi 3.4. For example, the user can adjust contextual menus more to his liking, web pages are automatically reloaded, and screenshots are immediately added to a new note if desired. to put hands on. Do you prefer the address bar or your tabs at the bottom of the screen, or do you want a different background image on your favorites page? Vivaldi is guaranteed to offer an institution for it. For those who are not familiar with the history of Vivaldi: the man behind the program, the Icelandic programmer and entrepreneur Jón Von Tetzchner, was the CEO of Opera Software for a long time. At that company, the maker of the Opera browser, he closed the door behind him in 2011 out of dissatisfaction. Opera, according to von Tetzchner, no longer served ‘the interests of the users nor of the programmers who were involved in the development in 1994’. In 2015, the Scandinavian hit back with a first test version of its Vivaldi browser, of which version 3.4 was released on Thursday.

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Latest version of Vivaldi browser includes an arcade game

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